The Second Plot

Three weeks ago we found out that we could finally have the plot that is next to ours. This now means that we have two hundred square metres of growing space and therefore what is considered to be a ‘full plot’. It’s not been fully cultivated as long as we’ve been on the site, so we guessed it would only be a matter of time before it became available, on that basis  as soon as we got our plot we put our names straight back on the waiting list.  Having said that, I think it came as a bit of shock to both of us when it finally happened and the enormity of starting all over again finally hit home.

The Second Plot

As you can see there was also quite a lot debris, given this plus the fact that we are very busy with our own plot at the moment we decided that we would take the summer to clear it, dig it over in the autumn cover it in manure and do nothing else until next year. We want to use it primarily for soft fruit, so good preparation and all that.

The Second Plot

What happened I’m not quite sure because three weeks later this is what it looks like.

The Second Plot

I have to give all the credit to Derek because he’s spent just about every spare minute working on it and is at Wickes as I write buying wood for compost bins etc. and I’m putting together an order for five more rhubarb plants, early varieties this time*, to plant at the front so mirroring what we already have.

The Second Plot

I’d like to say that we’ll do no more than that but I guess now we’ve started we’ll just have to finish.  What’s that adage about best laid plans?

 

*All recommendations welcome.

 

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27 Responses to “The Second Plot”

  1. Sue@GLAllotments April 13, 2014 @ 5:32 pm (#)

    If the plot hasn’t been cultivated it will be really fertile. When we took over derelict plots the first year everything grew huge. Will you plant to fruit through weed control? You’ve (Derek) have certainly done a fantastic job

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — April 13th, 2014 @ 8:11 pm

      That’s interesting Sue. I think we’ll definitely follow your example with the weed control, it makes such sense. Derek left you a comment further down the page.

  2. Sue@GLAllotments April 13, 2014 @ 5:32 pm (#)

    If the plot hasn’t been cultivated it will be really fertile. When we took over derelict plots the first year everything grew huge. Will you plant to fruit through weed control? You’ve (Derek) have certainly done a fantastic job

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — April 13th, 2014 @ 8:11 pm

      That’s interesting Sue. I think we’ll definitely follow your example with the weed control, it makes such sense. Derek left you a comment further down the page.

  3. Sue@GLAllotments April 13, 2014 @ 5:32 pm (#)

    If the plot hasn’t been cultivated it will be really fertile. When we took over derelict plots the first year everything grew huge. Will you plant to fruit through weed control? You’ve (Derek) have certainly done a fantastic job

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — April 13th, 2014 @ 8:11 pm

      That’s interesting Sue. I think we’ll definitely follow your example with the weed control, it makes such sense. Derek left you a comment further down the page.

  4. annjenny April 13, 2014 @ 6:26 pm (#)

    How exciting and what a transformation! More room for soft fruit sounds great.

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — April 13th, 2014 @ 8:12 pm

      I’m really looking forward to that Ann, especially currants.

  5. derekeross April 13, 2014 @ 8:23 pm (#)

    Thanks Sue, I was a bit frustrated by the sight of it and I got a spade into it and that was it. Since having the plot I have become more in-tune with the weather and what it means to the soil. Get it right and the elements really can work for you. Having said that, I am not doing any further digging for a while (famous last words!!).

  6. Margaret April 13, 2014 @ 11:10 pm (#)

    Amazing progress. Having two plots ourselves which have taken a good amount of time to sort out I’m very impressed. Good luck with the fruit growing. We’ve just completed a new fruit bed

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — April 15th, 2014 @ 4:13 pm

      Oh would love to see some photographs of that Margaret. We’re looking for inspiration.

  7. Margaret April 13, 2014 @ 11:10 pm (#)

    Amazing progress. Having two plots ourselves which have taken a good amount of time to sort out I’m very impressed. Good luck with the fruit growing. We’ve just completed a new fruit bed

  8. Margaret April 13, 2014 @ 11:10 pm (#)

    Amazing progress. Having two plots ourselves which have taken a good amount of time to sort out I’m very impressed. Good luck with the fruit growing. We’ve just completed a new fruit bed

  9. carminered darter April 14, 2014 @ 7:26 pm (#)

    Haha! “what happened I’m not quite sure”…. You are hilarious, well done! Looking forward to seeing how it develops : )

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — April 15th, 2014 @ 4:14 pm

      Thank you. Of course it was just irresistible. Hope all’s well with you.

  10. carminered darter April 14, 2014 @ 7:26 pm (#)

    Haha! “what happened I’m not quite sure”…. You are hilarious, well done! Looking forward to seeing how it develops : )

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — April 15th, 2014 @ 4:14 pm

      Thank you. Of course it was just irresistible. Hope all’s well with you.

  11. horticulturalhobbit April 14, 2014 @ 8:17 pm (#)

    I also have 200 square metres, snap! Has taken me a while to get my whole plot going though. Have had to do it in stages. Am expecting some Victoria rhubarb to plant it out. I have used cardboard over winter as weed supressant; but now the weeds are coming through as it warms up. Have used wilkos weed suppressant under woodchip for pathways. Just take your time!

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — April 15th, 2014 @ 4:16 pm

      We did over the first plot but have rushed headlong into this. More rhubarb planned for ours as well.

      • horticulturalhobbit replied: — April 15th, 2014 @ 4:42 pm

        I can empathise with the rushing. There is always enthusiasm. Case of making lists and working through them.

  12. horticulturalhobbit April 14, 2014 @ 8:17 pm (#)

    I also have 200 square metres, snap! Has taken me a while to get my whole plot going though. Have had to do it in stages. Am expecting some Victoria rhubarb to plant it out. I have used cardboard over winter as weed supressant; but now the weeds are coming through as it warms up. Have used wilkos weed suppressant under woodchip for pathways. Just take your time!

  13. home, garden, life April 16, 2014 @ 12:43 pm (#)

    My back aches just looking at this labour! Congratulations! The allotment should be happy to have you as a tenant! Why are not abandoned plots cleared before old tenant departs? Who owns the allotments?

  14. home, garden, life April 16, 2014 @ 12:43 pm (#)

    My back aches just looking at this labour! Congratulations! The allotment should be happy to have you as a tenant! Why are not abandoned plots cleared before old tenant departs? Who owns the allotments?

  15. alderandash May 13, 2014 @ 8:48 am (#)

    Wow that looks amazing…You must be itching to get it all planted up now it looks so beautiful!

    I’m starting a gardening club at my daughter’s school this week and we have a (much smaller!) but hugely overgrown plot to deal with. We’ll dig over a smallish patch – but for the bulk of it, I think we’ll cover it with cardboard to kill off some weeds, so we can plant pumpkins etc through the cardboard later in the season. It won’t look too pretty but hopefully the pumpkins leaves will cover it up!!

    I was wondering – is it lots of work to keep the grass edges looking good…? At home, we’re making a new veg plot (in the corner of a field), and I was thinking of just having grass paths this year – but I’m a bit of afraid of having to spend all my spare time edging and mowing!

  16. alderandash May 13, 2014 @ 8:48 am (#)

    Wow that looks amazing…You must be itching to get it all planted up now it looks so beautiful!

    I’m starting a gardening club at my daughter’s school this week and we have a (much smaller!) but hugely overgrown plot to deal with. We’ll dig over a smallish patch – but for the bulk of it, I think we’ll cover it with cardboard to kill off some weeds, so we can plant pumpkins etc through the cardboard later in the season. It won’t look too pretty but hopefully the pumpkins leaves will cover it up!!

    I was wondering – is it lots of work to keep the grass edges looking good…? At home, we’re making a new veg plot (in the corner of a field), and I was thinking of just having grass paths this year – but I’m a bit of afraid of having to spend all my spare time edging and mowing!

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