Sowing Micro Greens

Browsing through a pile of new seed catalogues has had me wishing the next few weeks away to the time when I can start to sowing for the next season.  I was getting a bit wistful about this when I came across a page seeds for micro greens.  Harvested a couple of weeks after germination, these are essentially seedlings that taste of the fully grown plant, used in the same way as cress or a fresh herb might be, the selling point being their intense flavour,  and pretty appearance.  The other big advantage is that they can be sown all year round giving a bit of a boost to the plate in winter.

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I ordered several varieties, the seed trays and the matting on which they grow.  I wouldn’t have normally gone this route but this is something I’m doing at home and so want to keep it simple.  You can use kitchen towel as the growing medium and any seeds you already have, with the exception of parsnips which are poisonous, salad greens and herbs work well.

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The seeds can be mixed but for this first attempt I’m keeping them separate to see which have the best flavour.  Here are the varieties:

Celery Leaf
Rocket Victoria
Basil Dark Opal
Coriander
Amaranth Red Army
Radish Sangria

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And this is how it goes.

Wet the matting or a double thickness of kitchen towel, place in the seed tray and sprinkle the seeds thickly on top.

Cover the trays and place on a window sill or greenhouse to germinate.

Water regularly  by misting.

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They should be ready between seven and twenty one days, when the first proper leaves have appeared.

Mine came from Marshalls, I also found some interesting seeds at Sowseeds.

 

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20 Responses to “Sowing Micro Greens”

  1. The Belmont Rooster December 4, 2013 @ 3:40 pm (#)

    Great post!

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — December 4th, 2013 @ 3:43 pm

      Thank you! If you’re interested in trying them I found a really interesting US based company called Sprout People.

  2. The Belmont Rooster December 4, 2013 @ 3:40 pm (#)

    Great post!

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — December 4th, 2013 @ 3:43 pm

      Thank you! If you’re interested in trying them I found a really interesting US based company called Sprout People.

  3. Margaret December 4, 2013 @ 4:27 pm (#)

    I’ve been growing micro greens during the winter for a couple of years now. It’s great to be able to have some home grown salad stuff at this time of year. I grow kale,red cabbage, radish, rocket and also pea shoots. Your varieties look interesting

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — December 4th, 2013 @ 4:35 pm

      I like cress anyway so thought these might be more interesting also thinking that it’s a good way to get some fresh coriander quickly. Would like to know what kale and cabbage are like.

  4. Margaret December 4, 2013 @ 4:27 pm (#)

    I’ve been growing micro greens during the winter for a couple of years now. It’s great to be able to have some home grown salad stuff at this time of year. I grow kale,red cabbage, radish, rocket and also pea shoots. Your varieties look interesting

  5. Margaret December 4, 2013 @ 4:27 pm (#)

    I’ve been growing micro greens during the winter for a couple of years now. It’s great to be able to have some home grown salad stuff at this time of year. I grow kale,red cabbage, radish, rocket and also pea shoots. Your varieties look interesting

  6. Sue@GLAllotments December 4, 2013 @ 4:50 pm (#)

    I found this to be a good way of using up some left over seed last winter, Nor exactly microgreens but mini lettuce leaves just for some fresh mixed salad leaves instead of supermarket packs.

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — December 4th, 2013 @ 5:22 pm

      Absolutely Sue. I have so many bits and pieces laying around. As soon as I reclaim the greenhouse from the shed building I need to have a good sort out.

  7. Southbourne Gardens December 4, 2013 @ 5:22 pm (#)

    Absolutely Sue. I have so many bits and pieces laying around. As soon as I reclaim the greenhouse from the shed building I need to have a good sort out.

  8. gardeninacity December 6, 2013 @ 3:26 am (#)

    Nice post. I’ve been thinking I should mix greens in with my flowering containers. They would make nice edible fillers around the flowers.

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — December 6th, 2013 @ 9:47 pm

      Thank you. I think so, would look really good and typical cottage garden style growing edibles in amongst the flowers.

  9. gardeninacity December 6, 2013 @ 3:26 am (#)

    Nice post. I’ve been thinking I should mix greens in with my flowering containers. They would make nice edible fillers around the flowers.

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — December 6th, 2013 @ 9:47 pm

      Thank you. I think so, would look really good and typical cottage garden style growing edibles in amongst the flowers.

  10. Anna December 6, 2013 @ 9:41 pm (#)

    An excellent way of satisfying the urge to get your hand dirty at this time of year 🙂

    • Southbourne Gardens replied: — December 6th, 2013 @ 9:50 pm

      Exactly what I thought, although they’re growing on mats so not quite the same. Only a few more weeks to wait though.

  11. Linnet November 8, 2014 @ 5:26 pm (#)

    Just started growing these with kit and seeds from Marshalls. Have found on the net a company named Living Foods of St.Ives (UK) and have ordered their packs of seeds which are more economical I think.
    Don’t really think these would work in amongst flowers. They need to be harvested when tiny and would be swamped by other plants.
    I feel it might be best to keep one variety of seed per tray as they grow at vastly different rates.

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